A little about taking medicines for depression and anxiety

‘Depression’ and ‘anxiety’ are two problems for which people often seek help. Help from family physicians, counsellors, psychologists, therapists, psychiatrists, reiki experts, yoga teachers, NLP practitioners, astrologers and a host of other possibly helpful people.

Very depressed people don’t much care what happens to their lives, and very anxious people can barely listen to anyone, even if they try. It’s difficult to reach them. Medicines can bring down depression or anxiety enough to help the patient think a little more clearly, and listen to what people concerned about his wellbeing are telling him.

Many antidepressants reduce both anxiety and depression. Extremely anxious people may need an additional dose of an anti-anxiety medicine for a week or two.

  • Antidepressants are not addictive and are usually given as a course for a few months.
  • Side effects usually appear at the beginning of treatment, last just a couple of weeks or so, and get lesser day by day. In case they don’t go away, there are other options.
  • Side effects cause some discomfort, but don’t affect work – and life in general – enough to discontinue their use. You don’t have to throw the baby out with the bathwater.
  • Therapeutic effects are seen in less than a fortnight with some antidepressants, although some can take up to 1½ months to make a difference.
  • The choice of medicine depends on what side effects you are trying to avoid.

These medicines are like an umbrella. Under their calming influence a patient can sort out his life. He can do this either on his own – by coming up with better ways of coping, or by talking things over with his psychiatrist, a psychologist or a therapist. And really, if the depressive episode or anxiety attack was brought on by a situation, talking things through with a friend may be enough!

He can explore meditation, yoga or any other lifestyle changes that he finds useful, and make them a part of his life from then on. If he can figure out what triggers anxiety or depression in him, that’s useful too.

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